Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Technology & Eggs



What do you think our founding fathers would think of "social networking?" I'm very interested in technology, I have worked as a technology teacher and I have just completed certification to be a library media specialist. I love exploring new software applications and teaching people how to use them.

When I came across this article on Boston.com I hatched (hence the word eggs in my title) an idea that maybe my blog friends would be interested in it also. I was naturally drawn to it because of my interest in technology and I thought I'd post this slide show as an article. I'd love to hear your thoughts on technology and social networking.

Now that you've had a moment to process this information, how do you think our founding fathers would react to today's technology?

1. The social venter
The social venter This person never misses an opportunity to document a bad work or personal situation on a social networking site. Facebook, Twitter, and personal blogs are littered with job-related groans and negative gripes. The solution: Look on the bright side. Keep the information that you post positive. Sticky or unpleasant situations are best discussed offline and in private.

This person never misses an opportunity to document a bad work or personal situation on a social networking site. Facebook, Twitter, and personal blogs are littered with job-related groans and negative gripes.
The solution: Look on the bright side. Keep the information that you post positive. Sticky or unpleasant situations are best discussed offline and in private.

2. The noise polluter

The noise polluter This person and their phone seem to lack a silent mode or off button. Your peaceful work day is interrupted by this person who noisily and freely makes calls without any regard for their colleagues. Their phone rings noisily and their conversations become impersonal and loud interruptions. The solution: Keep office noise at a minimum. Set your phone to silent mode at the office and hold personal conversations in private.

This person and their phone seem to lack a silent mode or off button. Your peaceful work day is interrupted by this person who noisily and freely makes calls without any regard for their colleagues. Their phone rings noisily and their conversations become impersonal and loud interruptions.
The solution: Keep office noise at a minimum. Set your phone to silent mode at the office and hold personal conversations in private.

3. The cryptic communicator

The cryptic communicator This person relies on shorthand texting, but doesn't limit it to just texting. Odd or informal abbreviations, poor punctuation, and spelling and grammatical goofs leave people shaking their heads and make the messages harder to decipher and understand. The solution: Improve your communication skills, at least by taking it easy on the abbreviations. Spending just a little more time on your communications makes them easier to decipher.

This person relies on shorthand texting, but doesn't limit it to just texting. Odd or informal abbreviations, poor punctuation, and spelling and grammatical goofs leave people shaking their heads and make the messages harder to decipher and understand.
The solution: Improve your communication skills, at least by taking it easy on the abbreviations. Spending just a little more time on your communications makes them easier to decipher.

4. The pop-up artist

The pop-up artist This persona manages to interrupt your work without having to be within a short, physical distance. This chat fanatic insists on sending you instant messages constantly throughout the day, sometimes without work in mind. The solution: Don't go overboard. IMs are fine for quick conversations but most people prefer e-mail.

This persona manages to interrupt your work without having to be within a short, physical distance. This chat fanatic insists on sending you instant messages constantly throughout the day, sometimes without work in mind.
The solution: Don't go overboard. IMs are fine for quick conversations but most people prefer e-mail.

5. The conference call con

The conference call con This is the person who pretends to pay attention in teleconferences but multitasks to the point where he has no clue about what's being discussed. Sadly, this is not an unusual problem: 45 percent of executives confessed to frequently doing other things while in these meetings, according to a Robert Half survey. The solution: Pay attention. While a little multitasking is all right from time to time, pay attention to relevant conversations. Being invested in the conversation can keep you from being distracted.

This is the person who pretends to pay attention in teleconferences but multitasks to the point where he has no clue about what's being discussed. Sadly, this is not an unusual problem: 45 percent of executives confessed to frequently doing other things while in these meetings, according to a Robert Half survey.
The solution: Pay attention. While a little multitasking is all right from time to time, pay attention to relevant conversations. Being invested in the conversation can keep you from being distracted.

6. The selfish networker

The selfish networker The concept of 'reciprocation' is lost on this person, who only visits professional networking sites when it benefits their own needs. This corporate climber solicits recommendations and introductions on LinkedIn, but never returns the favor or says thanks. The solution: Be a good friend or colleague. Follow the etiquette of social networking sites like LinkedIn so that your requests don't fall on deaf ears.

The concept of "reciprocation" is lost on this person, who only visits professional networking sites when it benefits their own needs. This corporate climber solicits recommendations and introductions on LinkedIn, but never returns the favor or says thanks.
The solution: Be a good friend or colleague. Follow the etiquette of social networking sites like LinkedIn so that your requests don't fall on deaf ears.

7. The friend counter

The friend counter This person is all about the quantity, not the quality, when it comes to Facebook friend requests. They will send friend requests out to anyone and everyone – even people they barely know – in order to have the most friends. The solution: Be more selective. Social networking is not about how many friends or followers you have, but the quality of those you are connected with. You'll find your contacts to be more worthwhile in the end.

This person is all about the quantity, not the quality, when it comes to Facebook friend requests. They will send friend requests out to anyone and everyone – even people they barely know – in order to have the most friends.
The solution: Be more selective. Social networking is not about how many friends or followers you have, but the quality of those you are connected with. You'll find your contacts to be more worthwhile in the end.

8. The trivial Twitterer

The trivial Twitterer Social networking sites for professionals are more about sharing the most important information than sharing all information. This person uses social networking sites such as Twitter and Facebook to post mundane facts about their life and work, such as what they had for lunch. Their contacts therefore get bombarded with these annoying little updates. The solution Be more insightful. Strategic Twitter and Facebook users, who use it for professional reasons, spotlight their expertise by offering valuable information such as industry news and articles. Weed out the unimportant comments to save everyone the time.

Social networking sites for professionals are more about sharing the most important information than sharing all information. This person uses social networking sites such as Twitter and Facebook to post mundane facts about their life and work, such as what they had for lunch. Their contacts therefore get bombarded with these annoying little updates.
The solution: Be more insightful. Strategic Twitter and Facebook users, who use it for professional reasons, spotlight their expertise by offering valuable information such as industry news and articles. Weed out the unimportant comments to save everyone the time.

9. The computer crasher

The computer crasher Without warning, this infamous inbox clogger sends mega-sized attachments that take forever to download or, worse, cause others' computers to crash and shut down. The solution: Be polite. For both the sender and the recipient, make sure the attached file is under the size limit and if it isn't, consider zipping the file or using a file transfer service.

Without warning, this infamous inbox clogger sends mega-sized attachments that take forever to download or, worse, cause others' computers to crash and shut down.
The solution: Be polite. For both the sender and the recipient, make sure the attached file is under the size limit and if it isn't, consider zipping the file or using a file transfer service.

10. The interview interrupter

The interview interrupter This is the person who never makes it into the workplace without screwing up the interview with constant texting. Addicts are so attached to their phones that they can't put them away to answer a few questions and therefore, have typed their way out of a job. The solution: It's obvious: Put away your phone. For interviews or other important meetings, make sure to put your phone in silent mode or to turn it off completely. The person on the other end can wait a few minutes while you get your life in order.

This is the person who never makes it into the workplace without screwing up the interview with constant texting. Addicts are so attached to their phones that they can't put them away to answer a few questions and therefore, have typed their way out of a job.
The solution: It's obvious: Put away your phone. For interviews or other important meetings, make sure to put your phone in silent mode or to turn it off completely. The person on the other end can wait a few minutes while you get your life in order.


14 comments:

  1. I guess most of us have come across some of these types - while few would ever admit being such a type themselves!

    For me, social networking on social media is merely a continuation and an enhancement of what I have been doing all my life - networking in the offline world, face to face, with people in my hometown, at work and so on.

    If put to use wisely and by keeping the balance between offline and online activities, it can (and does!) enrich my life.

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  2. Technology changes but the old manners and etiquette are still applicable to it. That's what people forget.

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  3. Oh Mary...this has made me so thankful that I left office work before the social networking phenomenon hit!! Thanks for making me smile though...Happy Wednesday xo

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  4. Debra said what I was thinking...

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  5. Yes, I also have to agree with Deb.
    My grandma was born in 1904 and already past away. She would not understand the world my kids grow up in.

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  6. oh god... I think i'm all these people! is there any help for me?

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  7. Gratefully I am not tech savvy. However I have seen my children bring their IPhones to the table. And being the obnoxious mother I am, I say you better not look at thing while we are eating, but they can txt blindfolded no sweat.

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  8. Oh dear ... technology has changed the way we perceive ourselves, hasn't it? I am always amazed that folks in meetings or on the subway or walking through public places can divorce themselves from all that is in the immediate environment and go 'into the screen'.

    I honestly don't think the founding fathers would have a problem with the technological advance,ment, but the manners of use? I'm sure Ben Franklin and Thomas Jefferson would have had some strong words ...

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  9. I just love how you refer to our founding fathers. Thank you for all your comments. I so enjoy being a homesteader. Thank you.
    Melissa

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  10. Gosh - texting in an interview? Who would dare?! Found this really interesting.

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  11. Rude is rude is rude. The old "it's what people do, today," doesn't cover what is basically an incredibly narcissistic society that thinks every thought or deed has to be shared. This is no different from those people who made everyone else wait while they talked on the phone so you'd know how busy and important they were back in the day -- in other words, they are never in the room with the people they are in the room with, anyone is more important than you and that's what will draw their attention. See my post, VCIPs Are Like Digital Two-Year-Olds http://bit.ly/gept9q

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  12. I am always trying to keep up with technology; I bought our first computer in 1998 and never looked back. I am 70 and the sad part is that none or very few of my friends are interested in learning.I would be lost without this magic box; Blogging has opened up a brand new world for me.
    Everything you wrote is right on; if only more poeple would see the light.
    Enjoy reading you.
    Rita

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  13. Great post! We're becoming quite an interesting society with our noses stuck in our smart phones. I'm wondering if the next generation won't even know how to have conversations with other people face-to-face.

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I'm thrilled you've stopped by and I always enjoy your comments! Thank you!